Does Terramin Clay Contain Vitamin B-12?

In a message dated 9/15/05 9:25:33 AM, Janet writes:

Dear Rhio,

I am interested in non-animal sources of vitamin B-12. Would this product contain this? (Referring to Terramin Clay)

Blessings,

Janet

Dear Janet,

I do not believe that it does, but I will ask my source and get back to you.

With blessings,

Rhio

Dear Janet,

The Terramin clay does not contain vitamin B-12, but the distributor informed me that the body needs minerals in order to produce it's own B-12 so Terramin could be considered an aid or facilitator for the body to produce its own.

With blessings and peace,

Rhio

In a message dated 10/5/05 12:47:39 PM, Janet writes:

Dear Rhio,

Thank you so much for remembering my question. I have just finished your book. I am doing my dissertation on raw food and am finding a lot of resources. However in the latest version of Spiritual Nutrition by Gabriel Cousens he says the same as Sally Fallon, that there are no vegetable sources of B- 12. Is this your opinion also?

Thank you again,

Janet

Dear Janet,

There are no easy answers to the vitamin B-12 question. On my website in the Articles section/subsection Health Information, look for some articles on Vitamin B-12 which could shed some light.

First, it has been established, but little known, that pollution, such as the nitrous oxide produced from catalytic converters in automobiles, depletes vitamin B-12 in the body. That is probably impacting people and depleting B-12 more than anything else, since pollution is so widespread.

Second, vitamin B-12 as you know is produced from bacteria. I believe that a normally functioning human body produces and absorbs B-12 in the intestines and also recycles some B-12 in the bile and also produces and absorbs some from the bacteria between the teeth and gums. I also believe that certain vegetarian foods also produce B-12 from the bacteria in or on them. Grapes are particularly susceptible to fermentation caused by bacteria, so grapes and particularly seeded grapes would be a source, in my opinion. Fermented foods would be a good source. Soil organisms still clinging to vegetables when ingested may produce B-12. That's why I encourage people to grow their own food organically (or at least some of it) and eat from the garden whenever they can. And don't wash it too much. After all, the animals in nature don't wash plants when they are out there grazing. Humans wash their produce in chlorinated, fluoridated water and think they are better off than the animals. I don't mean that produce shouldn't be washed (especially in public situations, like restaurants) but if we ate from our own organic and lovingly tended gardens more often, we wouldn't have to worry too much about washing produce.

Chlorella has been established as containing active B-12 (though some dispute it). There is new evidence from Europe that green leafy vegetables contain active B-12. Do a google search on a researcher by the name of Mozafar. His studies found that organic vegetables contain more B-12 when fertilized with manure. Non-organic or commercially grown vegetables have little or no B-12 because the pesticides and other "cides" used on them kill bacteria.

Lack of intrinsic factor secreted by the stomach, especially in older people or people with compromised immune systems, is also key to understanding B-12 absorption.

It's obvious that more studies have to be done on plant sources of bioavailable B-12 and how the body absorbs it, but if a vegan checks their B-12 status occasionally, they can monitor their own situation.

Good luck on your dissertation.

With blessings and peace,

Rhio

In a message dated 10/7/05 7:26:32 AM, Janet writes:

Rhio,

Thank you sooo much. No doubt you will be in my bibliography.

My husband and I have put an offer on 85 acres to begin growing biodynamic fruit, seeds and vegetables for the raw community. I also hope to help guests transition to live food.

In Love and Service,

Janet

Dear Janet,

I am thrilled to hear about your plans to grow biodynamic produce for the raw community.

My partner and I are also working on a similar project on 24 acres. We are in the process of planting fruit trees, vegetables, nuts, berries and edible weeds. Where is your farm to be located? We are growing organically (true organic, not the USDAs idea) and with the permaculture method. I would suggest that you look at the work of Sepp Holzer, an Austrian farmer who has produced some videos. I offer three of them on my website's shopping. The best of the three videos is the one called Terraces and Raised Beds, (although they are all excellent). He uses methods that, once implemented, keep the land producing abundantly on its own.

Best of luck to you and your husband on these heart-inspired projects. When you are up and running, I'd like to list you in my website's Directories section. Please keep me posted.

With blessings and peace,

Rhio

Rhio,

Wow, thanks! I'll check it out!

My husband studied at Michael Fields Agriculture Institute in Wisconsin to learn the Rudolph Stiener methods.

The beautiful 85 acres in Rose City (how cool is that?) Michigan and is 10 years without chemicals, has a stream and a flowing well, surrounded by government forest, an apple orchard, 2/3 wooded, a pole barn and nice hills for underground dwellings. We plan to use horses and oxen.

Love,

Janet

Dear Janet,

I'm holding a good thought for your dream farm to be under your loving care very soon.

With blessings,

Rhio


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