Fruit & Veggie Lady Recipies

(Recipes are from Hooked on Raw by Rhio and from Rhio’s Private Recipe Collection)

The Fruit and Veggie Lady Show was a 90-second feature that ran in syndicated radio markets in the United States for approximately a year. At the end of each show is contact and other information that is no longer active. For any questions about the shows,

contact Rhio at rhotline@rawfoodinfo.com

Table of Contents

Spinach Caesar Salad

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  • 1 large bunch spinach
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds, ground
  • 1–2 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2–1 tsp. prepared Dijon mustard
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil (extra-virgin)
  • dash of Celtic sea salt
  • sprinkle of freshly ground white pepper

1. Rinse the spinach very well under running water, one leaf at a time. Make sure there is no soil or sand in the bottom part near the roots. Another way to get the soil out is to put the spinach leaves into a large bowl and then fill the bowl with water. The leaves will rise to the top of the bowl. Shake them in the water to dislodge the soil. The sand or soil will sink to the bottom of the bowl. Sand in your salad is not tasty! Once clean, spin the spinach leaves dry in a salad spinner and put into a large bowl. Tear or cut the leaves into bite-size pieces.

2. Grind the pumpkin seeds. I like to use a kitchen utensil called a Salad-Shooter®, or you can use a coffee or nut grinder. Add the ground seeds to the spinach and toss well. (The pumpkin seeds are a substitute for the Parmesan cheese used in conventional Caesar salad recipes.)

3. In a small bowl, blend 1 or 2 pressed cloves of garlic, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, olive oil, a sprinkle of white pepper and Celtic sea salt. Pour over the spinach and toss well.

Serves 2-4.

Keeps for 1 day in the refrigerator.

Caesar Salad

Substitute 1 large head of romaine lettuce for the spinach in the above recipe.

Almond Mayonnaise

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  • 1/2 cup sprouted almonds, blanched (*see Glossary for sprouting info and for blanching instructions which will not cook the almonds)1 tbsp. soaked pine nuts (optional)
  • 1 heaping tbsp. agar-agar flakes
  • 1/2 clove garlic
  • 1/2–3/4 cup filtered water (put 2 ice cubes in the water)
  • 1 cup organic, unrefined oil – like extra-virgin olive oil (or use a combination of oils like: 1/2 extra-virgin olive & 1/2 sesame or sunflower oil with 1 tbsp. of flaxseed oil)
  • 3 tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp. unpasteurized apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp. raw honey
  • 1/4–1/2 tsp. Celtic sea salt
  • 1 tsp. freshly minced dill (optional)
  • 1/8 tsp. yellow mustard powder (or 1 tsp. prepared Dijon mustard)
  • 1/8 tsp. white pepper (grind fresh in a peppermill)

1. Place a small glass bowl and a wire whisk into the freezer for later use.

2. Put the almonds, pine nuts, agar-agar flakes, garlic and 1/2 cup of the water into the blender and blend very well, adding more water if necessary. (The ice cubes are in the water to keep it cold, which helps to solidify the mayonnaise when you add the oil.)

3. When the almonds are broken down to a fine cream, start adding in the oil very slowly. Have the blender running on medium or high (depending on your blender). The mayonnaise will start to thicken. If it gets thin, add in an ice cube or two, which will thicken it up again.

4. When all the oil is absorbed into the almond mixture, transfer the mayonnaise to the small chilled bowl and add in the lemon, vinegar and honey slowly, beating constantly with the wire whisk. Then, add in the Celtic sea salt and spices. Taste and adjust the flavors. Store in a glass jar in the refrigerator.

Makes almost 2 cups. Keeps up to 3 weeks in the refrigerator.

NOTE: If the mayonnaise separates (and gets thin) when you add in the lemon juice and spices, it is usually because you added them in too fast and didn’t whisk all the while. Should this happen, put the whole thing back into the blender, add in another 1/2 tbsp. agar-agar flakes and 2 to 3 ice cubes, and blend again. It should thicken up. If it still doesn’t, put the mayonnaise into the refrigerator, and after a while it will thicken from the cold.

Almond Milk

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  • 1 cup sprouted almonds, blanched (see **Additional Information below)
  • 3 1/2 cups filtered water

1. Process almonds in the blender with 1/2 to 1 cup of water until well blended, then add balance of water and blend again.

2. Pour into a cotton or muslin bag or cloth and squeeze out all the milk. This is simple, plain almond milk. This milk can be enjoyed as is or flavored in various ways (see suggestions below). The left over almond pulp can be discarded or used to make Almond Cookies (the subject of a future show).

Yield: almost a quart. Keeps for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.

The Sweet Almond Milk (see below) keeps 1–2 days. After storage, the milk separates – so shake well before using.

Sweet Almond Milk

1. Take plain Almond Milk, put into a blender with soaked dates and a little ground vanilla bean (see **Additional Information below) and blend well.Make with as many or as few dates as you like. Some people like it sweet and others prefer just a hint of sweetness. You can also try adding freshly ground lemon rind, pumpkin pie spice, nutmeg or cinnamon, or a combination. With experimentation you will hit upon a flavor combination which will taste delicious to you.

Exotic-Flavored Almond Milk

1. To 16 oz. of Sweet Almond Milk, add 1/4 tsp. rosewater and 1/8 tsp. cardamom powder. Blend well. Make sure to use food-grade rosewater, with no additives

Apple-Strawberry-Fig Pie

This Scrumptious Pie Recipe was Graciously Shared
by Cher Carden

Almond-Coconut Crust:

  • 3/4 cup almonds
  • 1/4 cup pecans
  • 1/2 cup sunflower seeds
  • 2 tbsp. shredded dried coconut

1. In a food processor with the “S” blade, process the above ingredients until nuts are reduced to tiny granules. Put into a bowl and set aside.

(You can use either Pie crust recipe, the one above or Leigh’s Basic Pie Crust.

Apple-Strawberry-Fig Filling:

  • 5 Granny Smith apples
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2 cup raisins (soak in water for 1 hour)
  • 1 cup dates (soak in water for 1 hour)
  • 1 cup dried figs (soak in water for 1 hour)
  • 1 tbsp. cinnamon
  • 1 pint strawberries

2. Core the apples, then shred the apples in a food processor using the shredder blade. Sprinkle with lemon juice and set aside.

3. Drain raisins and dates. Then process them with cinnamon in a food processor with the “S” blade, until a smooth, jam-like texture is reached.

4. Take 1/2 of this jam mixture and place in the bowl with the nuts previously set aside. Knead together until crust becomes like silly putty. Mold crust into a 9″ pie plate using your hands to flesh out the crust across the plate. (Or place crust in between 2 sheets of wax paper and roll flat with a rolling pin. Peel off 1 wax sheet and place flattened crust over pie plate and gently press into place.) Set aside.

5. Blend the remaining jam with the figs and 1/2 pint of strawberries in the food processor. Process well. (This is strawberry/fig jam.)

6. Remove strawberry/fig jam from the food processor and mix with the shredded apples. Fill the pie crust and smooth out with a spatula.

7. Decorate the top of the pie with the remaining strawberries.

Serves 6-8. Keeps for 3-4 days in the refrigerator.

Armenian Salad

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  • 1 large cucumber, diced
  • 1 cup celery, chopped
  • 1/2 cup radishes, finely diced
  • 1/2 cup Kalamata olives or Greek, black olives
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, soaked overnight (or at least 2 hours)1 tbsp. olive and flaxseed oil, combined
  • 1 tbsp. lemon juice

1. Soak the pitted olives in distilled water overnight to get rid of most of the salt. Next day – drain, rinse and chop the olives. (Desalted olives can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.) Drain, rinse and chop the walnuts also.

2. Combine all the ingredients in a salad bowl and toss.

Serves 2. Keeps for 2 days in the refrigerator

Blueberry Jello

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  • 1 pint blueberries
  • 2 bananas
  • 1/2 lemon or lime, juiced

1. Blend all the ingredients in a blender. Pour into custard cups and chill.

Makes 4 custard cups. Keeps for 2 days in the refrigerator.

Brazil Nut Wafers

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  • 2 cups Brazil nuts, soaked overnight in filtered water
  • 3 bananas (or 2 ripe plantains)
  • cinnamon
  • Rejuvelac (mild) or filtered water

1. Rinse and drain Brazil nuts. Put Brazil nuts in the blender with just enough Rejuvelac or water to cover. Blend, adding more liquid if necessary, until you have a smooth batter. Don’t make too thin. Then blend in bananas, adding cinnamon to taste.

2. Pour the batter, in the shape of round cookies, onto dehydrator trays lined with Teflex sheets. Dehydrate at 95° F for 1 or 2 days.

Yield: 18 wafers. Don’t worry about storage – they’ll be gone fast!

Buckies

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  • 1 quart sprouted buckwheat

1. Put the sprouted buckwheat into a food dehydrator and dry at 95° F until thoroughly dry.

SERVING SUGGESTIONS:

*Use in Great Nuts Cereal
*Can be added into soups or salads – for crunch.

Buttah

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  • 1 cup olive oil (extra-virgin)
  • 1/8–1/4 tsp. Celtic sea salt
  • 1 tbsp. agar-agar flakes

1. Put ingredients into a blender and blend very well.

2. Pour the mixture into an ice cube tray, filling each cube only halfway, and freeze.

3. Every time you need a butter substitute, take out a cube and let it sit for a couple of minutes before serving.

Carob (the Un-Chocolate) Sauce

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  • 1 cup raw sesame tahini
  • 1/4 cup raw honey
  • 1/2 cup (or more) of raw carob powder
  • 1/4 cup filtered water

1. Put all the ingredients, except the carob powder, into a bowl.

2. Begin stirring and add in 1/2 cup carob powder. Blend ingredients very well by hand, adding in more carob powder if desired. Let your own taste guide you. Also, add more water if you want it thinner, less water if you want it thicker.

Makes approx. 1 1/2 cups. Keeps for up to a month in the refrigerator.

NOTE: For a chunky sauce, add in finely chopped black figs and pecans.

Carrot-Apple Zinger

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  • 2 large carrots
  • 1 apple
  • 1 medium beet
  • 1 1-inch slice of fresh ginger

1. Put all ingredients through a juicer.

Serves 1.

Cilantro Detox

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  • 4-6 apples
  • 1 medium beet
  • 1/3 of a fennel bulb
  • juice of 1/2 lime
  • large handful of cilantro

1. Put all the ingredients through a juicer and enjoy.

Serves 1-2.

Cranberry Sauce

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  • 2 cups fresh cranberries
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, soaked in filtered water for at least 1 hour
  • juice of 1 orange
  • 1 orange, cut into pieces
  • peel from 1/4 of an orange, finely grated
  • 2-4 tbsp. raw honey

1. Put all ingredients into a food processor, and utilizing the “S” blade, blend well.

Creamy Tomato-Basil Soup

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  • 1 cup macadamias, soaked in filtered water for 8 hours and drained
  • 3/4 cup filtered water
  • 4-5 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1/2 cup fesh basil
  • 1/2 cup fesh dill
  • 1-2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
  • Celtic sea salt
  • a pinch of hot pepper or habanero powder (optional)

1. Soak 1 cup of raw macadamia nuts in filtered water for 8 hours. Drain and rinse.

2. Put the nuts into a blender with 3/4 cup of fresh filtered water and blend until creamy. Then add to the blender 4 or 5 chopped tomatoes, along with 1/2 cup each of fresh basil and fresh dill, 1-2 tbsp. of extra virgin olive oil, some Celtic sea salt and maybe a bit of hot pepper, or a pinch of habanero powder. Watch out now, not too much! The pepper is optional.

Caution: When using hot peppers be careful not to touch your face or eyes because you may inadvertently irritate them. I learned this the hard way when I was cutting some serrano peppers and then absentmindedly touched my eye. It became irritated and swollen and it took a few days to go back to normal. Always wash your hands first before touching face or eyes.

Creole Spice

  • 2 tbsp. Celtic sea salt
  • 2 tbsp. garlic powder
  • 2 1/2 tbsp. Hungarian paprika
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. onion powder
  • 2 tsp. ground white pepper
  • 1 tbsp. dried thyme
  • 1 tbsp. dried oregano
  • 1 tbsp. cayenne

1. Grind the Celtic sea salt in a nut mill and measure out 2 tbsp. into a small bowl.

2. Add all the other spices and with a spoon, blend them well. Store in a dark glass container in a cool place.

Yield: almost 1 cup. Keeps for up to 1 year.

Deviled Eggless

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Inspired by Jackie Graff, Chef at The Sprout Café, Atlanta

  • 2 cups macadamias, soaked in filtered water
  • 1 red bell pepper, finely chopped
  • 1/2 yellow bell pepper, finely chopped
  • 3 stalks of celery, finely chopped
  • 1/2 onion, minced
  • 1/4 cup lemon or lime juice
  • 1 tbsp. raw honey
  • 2 tsp. prepared mustard
  • 2 tsp. ground cumin
  • 2 tsp. turmeric
  • 1 to 2 tsp. dried thyme (or 1 tbsp. fresh, minced)
  • 1/2 tsp. freshly ground white pepper
  • 1 tsp. Celtic sea salt

1. Soak 2 cups macadamias overnight in filtered water.

2. Next day, drain and rinse.

3. Put the macadamias into a strong blender or Vita-Mix. Add in lemon juice, honey, mustard, cumin, turmeric, thyme, white pepper and Celtic sea salt. Blend into a smooth thick mixture, adding a little water if necessary to blend easier (but not too much). You may have to stop the blender a few times and tamp the mixture down. Transfer the macadamia cream to a bowl.

4. Now, add the following finely chopped vegetables into the macadamia mixture: 3 celery stalks, 1/2 large onion, 1 large red bell pepper and 1/2 yellow bell pepper. Mix well.

Serves 4-6. Keeps for 2-3 days in the refrigerator.

Dim Some

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  • 4 avocados
  • 1 cup Greek sun-dried black olives, desalted (see above)
  • 1/2 cup, or more, of diced onion
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/4 tsp. Celtic sea salt (optional)
  • 1/2–1 tsp. Creole Spice (see below)
  • 2 medium turnips or rutabagas
  • 8 sheets of nori

1. Pit the avocados and scoop out the pulp into a large bowl. Squeeze the lemon juice over the avocados. Set aside.

2. Mince the olives and onions and add to the avocados in the bowl. Add Creole Spice and Celtic sea salt and mash the contents of the bowl with a wire whisk or fork until it becomes the consistency of guacamole.

3. With a V-Slicer or mandoline, slice the turnips or rutabagas into very thin circles. Cut each nori sheet in half and then in half again creating 4 square pieces per sheet. Dip the pieces briefly in filtered water and place them on the counter. Put a heaping tsp. of the avocado mix in the center of each nori piece and then fold up the sides of the nori creating a little pouch. Place each pouch on a turnip or rutabaga slice and serve.

Yield: approx. 30 pieces.

Down Home Greens

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  • 1 bunch collard greens
  • 1 bunch kale or swiss chard
  • 2 tbsp. flaxseed oil
  • 1/4 lemon, juiced
  • 3 tbsp. unpasteurized apple cider vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. unheated honey
  • 1–2 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 1 tsp. ground cumin
  • 1/2 scant tsp. Celtic sea salt or to taste

1. Wash the greens and cut out the rib going almost all the way down the middle of the leaf (save for juicing). Put the slivers into a large bowl and set aside.

2. Lay the greens one on top of the other and then fold in half and roll the whole bunch into a tight roll. (You’ll probably have to do this twice to use all the greens.) Starting at one end of the roll, cut into very thin slivers.

3. In a small bowl, mix the rest of the ingredients and blend well into a dressing.

4. Toss the greens with the dressing until they are well coated. Put approx. 3 heavy plates directly on top of the greens. Cover and let marinate in the refrigerator overnight. The plates help compress the dressing into the tough green leaves. These greens could also be served just freshly prepared, but you may need time to get used to the flavor.

Serves 2-4. Keeps for 2-3 days in the refrigerator.

Dr. Kirschner’s Green Drink

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In an Out of Print Book by Dr. Kirschner, I Found This Wonderful Recipe, which I’ve Modified a Little

  • 1 pineapple, juiced
  • 15 almonds, soaked
  • 4 dates, soaked and pitted
  • 2 heaping tbsp. of soaked sunflower seeds
  • 1–2 large handfuls (or more) of fresh green leaves (see below)
  • 1/2 tsp. kelp powder

1) Juice 1 pineapple, then put into the blender with all the other ingredients and blend well.

Makes approximately 1 quart of a delicious and nutritious drink. Best consumed the same day.

NOTE: The green leaves can be one or a combination of watercress, parsley, spinach, arugula, beet tops, etc. or you can use wild herbs if you can get them. Dr. Kirschner had his own garden of wild edible weeds, such as lamb’s quarters, purslane, comfrey, chickweed, filaree, malva, dandelion, etc.

VARIATION: This drink can also be made with just the pineapple juice blended with the green leaves.

Enzymes

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French Lentil Tapenade

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  • 1/2 cup sprouted French lentils
  • 1/2 cup Nicoise or Kalamata olives (take the pits out and soak in distilled water overnight to remove most of the salt)
  • 1 tbsp. capers (soak overnight in distilled water)
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley
  • 1/2 lemon or lime, juiced
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil (extra-virgin)

1. Drain the water out of the olives and capers and rinse well.

2. Put all the ingredients into a food processor and, using the “S” blade, process as fine as possible.

Makes about 1 cup. Keeps for 1 week.

NOTE: Good as a topping for raw crackers.

Gorgeous Greens

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It is recommended that you have a gorgeous green salad every single day. In Italy, they say that a day without salad is like a day without the sun.Gorgeous Greens is a salad made with a variety of leafy greens such as:* succulent leaf lettuces: bibb, red leaf, romaine, etc.* spicy greens: arugula, watercress, nasturtium leaves, etc.* bitter greens: chicory, escarole, dandelion, radicchio, etc.

* wild herbs, if you can get them: lamb’s quarters, chickweed, purslane, etc., and

* edible flowers: squash blossoms, nasturtiums, red clover, marigolds, chrysanthemums, etc.

Put together a selection from the different categories, keeping the first category predominant. Wash and spin dry in a salad spinner. Toss with your favorite dressing. Best when eaten freshly made.

Great Nuts Cereal

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For each serving of Great Nuts Cereal:

  • 1/2 cup Buckies (see above)
  • 1/2 banana
  • 1/2 cup cherries or other fruit
  • 1 heaping tbsp. raisins
  • 1 cup Almond Milk (see recipe above)
  • honey, to taste (optional)

1) Combine all ingredients in a bowl, and dig in!

Guacamole

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  • 2 medium avocados
  • 1/3 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 small tomato, diced
  • 1/2 cup cucumber, diced
  • 1/3 cup red bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1 tbsp. red bell pepper powder (optional)
  • 1/8 tsp. Celtic sea salt

1. Mash or cube the avocados and mix with the vegetables and spices.

Serves 2.

Best eaten when freshly made, but keeps for 2 days in the refrigerator. When storing, leave the avocado pits in the Guacamole to help maintain freshness. Serve on a bed of leafy greens.

Hibiscus Punch

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Hibiscus is a flower which is dried and much used in Mexico as a refreshing beverage. This punch could be the original Kool-Aid. If kids ask for Kool-Aid, try giving them this instead.

FOR 2 QUARTS OF PUNCH:

  • 1 1/2 quarts of filtered water
  • 1/4 cup dried hibiscus flowers
  • 1 pint of mixed fresh fruit juices (try 1 cup of a mixture of orange and tangerine juice with a squeeze of lime, and 1 cup of pineapple juice)
  • 3 tbsp. raw honey or to taste
  • garnish with a few grapes

1. Put the dried hibiscus flowers into 1 1/2 quarts of filtered water, stir and let sit at room temperature overnight or for at least 3 hours. The water will become a beautiful shade of pink.

2. Drain the flowers and discard. Transfer the hibiscus water to a punch bowl, add the other ingredients and blend well. Refrigerate until cold.

3. When ready to serve, float grapes in the punch bowl. Serve with a slice of tangerine on the rim of each glass.

If you want a gallon, double the recipe.

Keeps for 3 to 4 days in the refrigerator.

Honey of a Pistachio Spread

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  • 1 cup raw pistachios
  • 1 tbsp. unheated honey
  • sprinkle of Celtic sea salt
  • squeeze of lemon (some people like it with lemon and some without)

1. Put ingredients into a food processor & process using the “S” blade.

Yield: 1 cup. Keeps for up to a week.

SERVING SUGGESTIONS: Spread on celery sticks and serve them as an appetizer.

Honey Vanilla Ice Cream

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  • 2 cups Almond Milk (see recipe above)
  • 1/2 vanilla bean (cut into tiny pieces)
  • 2 1/2–3 tbsp. raw honey (choose a mild-flavored variety, like clover, so the flavor of the vanilla comes through)

1. Put all the ingredients into a blender and blend very well. Blend long enough so that the vanilla bean breaks up and releases its flavor, then pour the liquid into an ice cube tray and freeze overnight.

2. When ready to serve, put the cubes through the Champion (or Green Power) juicer with the blank (homogenizer) in place.

Makes 1 pint.

NOTE: To get the cubes out of the ice cube tray, use a dinner knife (NOT a sharp knife) and gently pry around the edges of the cubes. A sharp knife will cut into the plastic of the tray, which I discovered when I saw a tray after someone had made some ice cream. You DON’T want plastic in your ice cream!

Honeyed Nuts

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  • 1/2 cup pistachios, chopped
  • 1/2 cup black walnuts (or English walnuts), chopped
  • 1/2 tsp. olive oil (or sunflower oil)1 tsp. raw honeydash Celtic sea salt

1. In a small bowl, blend the honey, olive or sunflower oil and Celtic sea salt.

2. next, mix the nuts with the honey mixture, blending together by hand.

Yield: 1 cup. Keeps for two weeks in the refrigerator.

NOTE: This makes a delicious nutty topping for any of my non-dairy ice cream recipes.

It’s So Easy Eatin’ Green

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  • 1/2 head romaine lettuce, chopped
  • 1 tomato, diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1 cucumber (unwaxed, if possible), sliced
  • a few swiss chard or collard leaves, sliced very thin, like ribbons

1. Put all the above ingredients into a bowl and set aside while you make the dressing.

DRESSING INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 or 2 oz. extra-virgin olive oil
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 1 clove of garlic, pressed
  • 1/2 tsp. prepared mustard
  • Celtic sea salt, to taste

2. Toss the salad with the dressing and serve.

Lazy Man’s Porto Pitza

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This Deceptively Simple Recipe was Shared by Raw Food Chef Extraordinaire, Paul Nison

  • 4 portobello mushrooms
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • raw almond butter
  • 1 tomato
  • 1 avocado

1. Clean the mushrooms and cut off the stems. (Save the stems to toss into salads or dehydrate them.)

2. Turn the mushrooms over and squeeze lemon juice over the bottoms. Spread almond butter on the mushroom bottom. Top with slices of tomato and avocado.

Serves 2. Serve immediately.

Leigh’s Basic Pie Crust

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  • 1/2 cup of raw almonds
  • 1/2 cup of walnuts
  • 1/2 cup of hulled sunflower seeds
  • 5 to 8 large pitted dates, depending on how sweet you like it
  • 2 tbsp. of raw carob powder (optional)

1. Put all ingredients into a food processor and utilizing the “S” blade, process well.

2. Mold the resulting dough into a 9 ” glass pie pan.

3. This recipe also makes great candy. Just roll the dough into little balls and sprinkle with coconut, sesame seeds or ground almonds.

Lynn’s Honey-Mustard Dressing

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Inspired by a Lovely Farm Lady in Puerto Rico

  • 6 oz. olive oil (extra-virgin)
  • 2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. prepared Dijon mustard
  • 2 oz. raw honey
  • 2 tbsp. garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp. Celtic sea salt

1. Put all ingredients into a blender and blend to a creamy consistency.

Yield: 1 cup. Keeps for 2 weeks or more in the refrigerator.

Maggie’s Wedding Cake

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This Recipe was Generously Shared by Maggie J. Hodge-Neill, C.C.T., Natural Health Educator

  • 3 large apples, grated (choose hard ones, not soft or mushy)
  • 1 cup grated carrots
  • 1 or 2 mangoes, mashed (optional, but makes the cake moister)
  • 1/4 lemon, juiced
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup walnuts (or other nuts) coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup raw carob
  • 1 cup dehydrated shredded coconut
  • 1 cup finely chopped dates
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1/3 cup dried pineapple (opt.) soaked 1/2 hr. & cut into small pieces
  • 1/3 cup dried papaya (opt.) soaked 1/2 hr. & cut into small pieces
  • 1 heaping tsp. cinnamon

1. Put all ingredients into a large bowl. With clean hands, mix and squeeze through fingers. Blend it all together with lots of love.

2. Press the cake into a large glass Pyrex® loaf pan, approx. 1 1/2″ high.

3. Refrigerate for 2-3 hours before serving.

Serves 12. Keeps up to a week in the refrigerator.

VARIATIONS: Instead of making a cake, roll mixture into little balls. Then roll the balls onto sesame or chia seeds or shredded coconut. Makes a zillion balls!

Mashed “No Potatoes” and Gravy

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  • 1 cauliflower
  • 2 cups pecans, soaked 1 hour
  • 2 cups filtered water
  • 1/4 onion
  • 2 tsp. poultry seasoning*
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil (extra-virgin)
  • Celtic sea salt, to taste

“NO POTATOES”:

1. Take the leaves off of the cauliflower and cut the core out. Save for salads or juicing. Cut the remaining cauliflower into small chunks.

2. Put the cauliflower chunks into a food processor, and using the “S” blade, process very fine until it kind of looks like mashed potatoes. Depending on the size of your food processor, you may have to do this in 2 or 3 batches (to process the entire cauliflower). Set “no potatoes” aside in a bowl.

PECAN GRAVY:

3. Put the pecans, water, onion, poultry seasoning, and olive oil into a blender and blend to a gravy consistency. Taste and adjust flavors by adding Celtic sea salt if necessary.

4. To serve: Put one or two scoops of “no potatoes” onto a plate, cover with gravy and ENJOY!

Serves 4-6.

The gravy keeps in the refrigerator for 2-3 days. The cauliflower should always be freshly prepared.

*Find a poultry seasoning combination that includes basil, rosemary, sage, marjoram, thyme, and coriander. The Spice Hunter is one such brand.

Nutty Parmezan

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  • 2 cups pine nuts
  • Celtic sea salt

1) Soak the pine nuts in filtered water for 8 hours. Rinse, drain and sprout for 8 hours.

2) Rinse the pine nuts, then place on a mesh dehydrator tray and dehydrate at 95° F for 24 to 36 hours, or until thoroughly dry.

3) Grind the pine nuts in a coffee/nut mill, adding approx. 1/4 to 1/2 tsp. Celtic sea salt.

Store the Nutty Parmezan in the refrigerator.

Yield: a little more than 2 cups. Keeps for up to a month in the refrigerator.

‘Ole Fashioned Lemonade

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Soft Drink Alternative

  • juice of 1 lemon or lime
  • 1 quart chilled filtered water
  • ice cubes
  • raw honey to taste

1) Whiz it all up in a blender and serve.

Olives

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The fruit of an evergreen tree grown chiefly in the Mediterranean and other warm regions. The fruit cannot be eaten as is, but must be cured in order to remove its bitterness. If you try to bite into a raw olive, as I did, you will quickly be dissuaded; it is terribly bitter. When some olives growing by the beach fell into the sand, it was accidentally discovered that soaking olives in sea water dispelled the bitterness.

Always purchase naturally processed olives; otherwise, they may have been treated with lye and other chemicals.

HOW TO GET THE SALT OUT:

Soak olives in distilled water for a few hours to plump them up (which makes them easier to pit). Then put the olives through a cherry pitter. If you don’t have a cherry pitter that works well, pit them by hand. After pitting, once again cover the olives with distilled water (distilled water draws minerals to it), and let sit at room temperature for 15 hours. Then drain and rinse them well. Yes, you will lose some of the flavor this way, but they are a lot healthier without all the salt.

Orange Apricot Marmalade

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  • 1 cup dried apricots, soaked overnight in filtered water
  • 2 small honey tangerines (peel and take the seeds out)
  • 1 tbsp. tangerine peel, minced or grated
  • 8 dates, pitted
  • 1 1/2 tsp. psyllium seed powder*
  • 1 tsp. agar-agar flakes*

1. Put all ingredients into a food processor with the “S” blade and blend well.

Makes approx. 10 oz. Keeps for 2 weeks or longer in the refrigerator.

NOTE: Spread on Brazil Nut Wafers (see above).

* These ingredients can usually be found in a health food store.

Orange Pudding

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  • 1 cup raisins, soaked overnight (or minimum 2 hours)
  • 1/2 cup almonds, soaked overnight & blanched (**see Additional Information below)
  • 1 tbsp. pine nuts, soaked overnight
  • 2 oranges
  • 1/4 tsp. Vanilla Powder (ground vanilla bean)

1. Drain soaked raisins (reserve water for other uses) and put into a blender with the juice and pulp of the oranges, blanched almonds, pine nuts, and the Vanilla Powder. Blend well and put into custard cups. Chill.

Serves 4.

Best served the same day, but will keep for 2 days in the refrigerator. For storage, cover with plastic wrap. (Instead of plastic wrap, you could use small demitasse saucers as covers for the custard cups.)

Orange Sherbert

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  • 1 cup Almond Milk
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • 2 tbsp. raw, mild clover honey

1. Put all ingredients into the blender and blend until smooth and the honey is dissolved. Taste it. You may need to add more honey if it is not sweet enough for you.*

2. Pour into an ice cube tray and freeze overnight. When ready to serve, put the cubes through the Champion (or comparable) juicer with the blank (homogenizer) in place.

Makes approx. 1 pint.

*Use the juice of sweet organic oranges or tangerines because it is usually less acidic than the juice of conventionally grown citrus.

Pineapple Sorbet

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  • 1 pineapple
  • 1–2 tbsp. raw honey

1. Wash and peel the pineapple. Prepare fresh pineapple juice in a juicer.

2. Put the juice into a blender and blend with the honey. Pour the juice into ice cube trays and freeze.

3. When ready to make the sorbet, put the pineapple cubes into a food processor and process to a sorbet consistency. Serve immediately.

Serves 2.

Power Assurance Drink

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  • 2 apples
  • 3 or 4 carrots
  • 1 small beet
  • a handful of leafy parsley
  • add a sliver of ginger for zest

Put all the ingredients through a juicer.

NOTE: That handful of parsley has vitamins, minerals, and life-giving chlorophyll that beat any of those synthetic so-called health drinks for seniors and children, and the carrots, apples and beet are very cleansing to the body. Raw power!

Power Breakfast Smoothie

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  • 2 bananas
  • 1 cup of fresh fruit, like strawberries, raspberries or blueberries
  • 1/2 fresh papaya or 1 mango
  • a scoop of raisins
  • a scoop of walnuts
  • a scoop of sunflower seeds
  • a few pitted dates (if you want it sweeter)

1. Put all the ingredients into a blender and blend it for a few seconds.

NOTE: You can make many variations of this power drink using whatever fruit you have on hand. Organically grown fruit, if you can get it, is your best bet.

Quick & Basic Salad Dressing

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  • 2 tbsp. olive oil (extra-virgin)
  • 2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice or 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, pressed
  • Celtic sea salt to taste

1. Blend all ingredients together in a small bowl. Adjust flavor to your taste.

Enough for 1 large salad. Serve immediately.

Quick Blender Soup

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in Five Minutes Flat

1. Start off with 1 or 2 tomatoes. Roughly chop them and put into the blender. Add in any raw vegetables, leafy green vegetables or sprouts. Use mostly vegetables that grow above the ground. If you want to use a root vegetable, put in only 1 or 2 small chunks.

SUGGESTED COMBINATIONS:

QuickSoup #1
tomatoes
celery leaves
spinach
sprouts
onion
garlic
lemon
avocado
QuickSoup #2
tomatoes
asparagus
spinach
shitake mushroom
avocado
QuickSoup #3
cucumber
tomato
spinach
buckwheat
lettuce
sunflower
greens
chives or dill

These soups are a little bland, so to make them more interesting, you can add some other ingredients on top of the soup before serving. Try one or a combination of the following:

chopped chives
chopped scallions
diced cucumbers and/or tomatoes
sprouted sunflower seeds
chopped olives
Vegetable Seasoning

Raspberry Sorbet

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  • 1 package frozen raspberries (8 oz). Organic, if you can get ’em.
  • 1 heaping tbsp. raw honey
  • 1/4 cup filtered water
  • raisins (optional)
  • walnuts, chopped (optional)

1. Mix the filtered water and honey in a cup until the honey dissolves.

2. Put the raspberries into a food processor using the S blade. Add the honey/water mixture and process until it becomes the consistency of sherbet. Taste it and make sure it is sweet enough for you. Transfer to bowls and sprinkle with raisins and chopped walnuts if you like.

Serve right away before it melts.

Rhio’s Hot Drink

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  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 small onion
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/4 fresh jalapeno pepper, seeded (or to taste… start out with less)
  • 1-2 tsp. olive oil and flaxseed oil (mixed)

1. Put all ingredients, except the oil, through a juicer. Then add the oil and stir. Or for a thicker drink, blend everything in a blender.

Serves 1.

NOTE: This is a good aid for losing weight if you have it as your dinner. You could even double the amount and you would still lose weight.

Salmon Paté

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This Recipe was Generously Shared by Marian Reed of Georgia

  • 1 cup almonds, soaked overnight
  • 1 medium size ripe and firm tomato
  • 1/4 of a medium size mild onion (red or Vidalia)
  • 1 garlic clove
  • dash of Bragg Liquid Aminos (or Celtic Sea Salt or Nama Shoyu Soy Sauce)

1. Make this recipe with or without the almond skins. The paté has one flavor with the skins, and a slightly different flavor without. See below for instructions on removing the skins easily.

2. Put all ingredients into a Vita-Mix blender or food processor and blend well. Add seasoning to taste.

Serves 2-3. Keeps for 2-3 days in the refrigerator.

NOTE: This recipe is so simple and so delicious. If the paté comes out too loose, you could add more almonds to firm it up.

VARIATION: For a stronger salmon-like flavor, cover the paté with a cotton cloth and let sit out at room temperature overnight. In the morning, refrigerate.

Savory Nut Crackers

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  • 1/2 cup soaked walnuts
  • 1/2 cup soaked pine nuts
  • 2 cups soaked or sprouted sunflower seeds

soak above nuts and seeds in filtered water

  • 1/2 cup Jerusalem artichokes (sprinkle with lemon juice)
  • 1/2 cup carrots
  • 1/2 cup parsley
  • 1 garlic clove
  • dash of Celtic sea salt or Nama Shoyu

1. Rinse the nuts and seeds and drain. Process all ingredients through a Champion or Green Power juicer with the blank in place.

2. Mix well with a spoon or your hands. Form into round, flat patties and place onto mesh dehydrator trays. Dehydrate at 95° F for 1 to 2 days.

Makes 18 crackers. When thoroughly dry, they will keep a long time at room temperature. I keep mine in a bowl with a muslin cloth on top.

NOTE: If you can’t find Jerusalem artichokes (also known as sunchokes), substitute with more carrots.

Serge & Valya’s Coleslaw

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  • 1/2 head green cabbage, grated
  • 1/2 head red cabbage, grated
  • 1 cucumber, diced
  • 1 tomato, diced
  • 1/4 onion, diced fine

Dressing:

  • 1/2 tsp. Celtic sea salt
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1 tsp. raw honey
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1. Put all the vegetables into a bowl, and massage with 1/2 tsp. Celtic sea salt to soften the cabbage a little.

2. Combine the lime juice, honey and olive oil, pour over the coleslaw, and toss well.

Serves 4-6.

Keeps for 3 days in the refrigerator.

Spinach Caesar Salad

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  • 1 large bunch spinach
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds, ground
  • 1–2 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2–1 tsp. prepared Dijon mustard
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil (extra-virgin)
  • dash of Celtic sea salt
  • sprinkle of freshly ground white pepper

1. Rinse the spinach very well under running water, one leaf at a time. Make sure there is no soil or sand in the bottom part near the roots. Another way to get the soil out is to put the spinach leaves into a large bowl and then fill the bowl with water. The leaves will rise to the top of the bowl. Shake them in the water to dislodge the soil. The sand or soil will sink to the bottom of the bowl. Sand in your salad is not tasty! Once clean, spin the spinach leaves dry in a salad spinner and put into a large bowl. Tear or cut the leaves into bite-size pieces.

2. Grind the pumpkin seeds. I like to use a kitchen utensil called a Salad-Shooter®, or you can use a coffee or nut grinder. Add the ground seeds to the spinach and toss well. (The pumpkin seeds are a substitute for the Parmesan cheese used in conventional Caesar salad recipes.)

3. In a small bowl, blend 1 or 2 pressed cloves of garlic, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, olive oil, a sprinkle of white pepper and Celtic sea salt. Pour over the spinach and toss well.

Serves 2-4.

Keeps for 1 day in the refrigerator.

Caesar Salad

Substitute 1 large head of romaine lettuce for the spinach in the above recipe.

Squaghetti with Garlic & Oil

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  • 1 medium butternut squash
  • 4 oz. olive oil (extra-virgin)
  • 4 cloves garlic (pressed)
  • 1/2-3/4 cup Nutty Parmezan
  • Celtic sea salt, to taste
  • garnish: minced parsley

1. Grate the butternut squash into spaghetti-like threads with a Saladacco. Cut the threads a little so that they will be easier to eat. (The Saladacco is a handy piece of kitchen equipment that grates squashes and all hard root vegetables into spahetti-like threads.) If you do not have a Saladacco, use a potato peeler to shave the squash lengthwise into long, thin strips. Peel the skin off the butternut squash first. (When using a Saladacco there is no need to peel.)

2. In a small bowl, mix the oil, garlic and Celtic sea salt.

3. Toss the Squaghetti with the garlic and oil until well coated. Add the Nutty Parmezan and toss again. Sprinkle with a little minced parsley. Serves 4.

Serves 4.

VARIATION: Add one or a combination of diced tomatoes, mushrooms, bell peppers and basil.

Wake-Up Gruel

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  • 1 cup sunflower sprouts (or sunflower seeds – soaked overnight)
  • 1/2 cup sprouted whole oats (or rolled oats – soaked overnight)
  • 1/2 cup prunes (soaked overnight and pitted*)
  • 2 oranges, juiced
  • 1 tbsp. raw, unheated honey
  • squeeze of lemon

1. In a blender, blend the sunflower sprouts, oats, orange juice, lemon juice and honey. Then, add in the prunes and blend again. You can blend to either smooth or chunky.

Serves 1-2.

NOTE: You could add sliced fruit (such as banana, mango or papaya) on top.

Watercress & Red Bell Pepper Salad

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  • 2 bunches watercress, chopped
  • 3 red bell peppers, julienne
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds, ground
  • 3 tbsp. dehydrated onion, flaked or powdered (or use fresh minced onion, to taste)
  • 1–2 garlic cloves, pressed
  • small piece of fresh ginger, pressed (use garlic press)
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1 tbsp. flaxseed oil (or use 1 tbsp. of half flaxseed oil and half sesame oil)
  • Nama Shoyu or Celtic sea salt, to taste (optional)
  • for garnish: clover or alfalfa sprouts

1. Mix the first four ingredients together in a large bowl. Set aside.

2. In a small bowl, blend the oil, lemon juice and seasonings, to taste. Pour over the salad and toss well. Transfer to serving bowls and garnish with clover or alfalfa sprouts all around the edge.

Serves 2-4, depending on how hungry you are.

Keeps 1 day in refrigerator.

**Additional Information

How To Sprout Almonds:

When sprouting almonds, first rinse the almonds. Then put them into a bowl and cover with three times as much filtered water and let soak overnight (12 to 15 hours). Next day, drain and rinse the almonds. Put them back into the bowl (without water) and spread the almonds up the sides of the bowl a little. Let them sprout for 1 or 2 days, rinsing them twice a day. You will not be able to see the actual sprout unless you remove the skin, and then you will see it very clearly.

After they are sprouted, you can store them in the refrigerator in filtered water and change the water every two days to prevent fermentation. Keeps for up to a week.

Blanched Almonds:

To blanch almonds (without cooking them), first prepare a large bowl of cold water into which you have added two trays of ice cubes. Then heat up some other water to a boil, turn off the flame, and put in the sprouted almonds for 7 seconds. Time the 7 seconds, and stay with the pot. If you move away to do something else, you might not come back to your almonds in 7 seconds, and then you will have cooked them. Drain the almonds quickly through a colander and plunge the colander into the ice water. This stops the process of cooking immediately. The almond skins will then pop off easily when you push them between your thumb and forefinger.

Why Is It Necessary to Remove Almond Skins?

Almond skins have a high concentration of tannic acid. Research has indicated that tannic acid may interfere with the body’s uptake of iron. When you eat a lot of almonds, it might be a good idea to remove the skins. (If you are just having a handful, then you don’t need to skin them.)

The Merck Index states that tannic acid is highly soluble in water. Once the almonds have been soaked, I suspect a lot of the acid is leached out, but I have not had my theory tested.

Olives

The fruit of an evergreen tree grown chiefly in the Mediterranean and other warm regions. The fruit cannot be eaten as is, but must be cured in order to remove its bitterness. If you try to bite into a raw olive, as I did, you will quickly be dissuaded; it is terribly bitter. When some olives growing by the beach fell into the sand, it was accidentally discovered that soaking olives in sea water dispelled the bitterness.

Always purchase naturally processed olives; otherwise, they may have been treated with lye and other chemicals.

How To Get The Salt Out?

Soak olives in distilled water for a few hours to plump them up (which makes them easier to pit). Then put the olives through a cherry pitter. If you don’t have a cherry pitter that works well, pit them by hand. After pitting, once again cover the olives with distilled water (distilled water draws minerals to it), and let sit at room temperature for 15 hours. Then drain and rinse them well. Yes, you will lose some of the flavor this way, but they are a lot healthier without all the salt.

Vanilla Bean

The vanilla bean is the fruit of certain varieties of tropical orchids. It originated in Mexico, but today is also cultivated in such exotic places as Tahiti, Madagascar and Bali. Vanilla is truly an intoxicating smell and taste experience.

Vanilla Powder, as called for in some of the recipes, is simply ground vanilla bean: Cut 3 vanilla beans into small pieces, put them into a nut (or coffee) grinder, and grind as fine as possible. Store in a small glass jar in the refrigerator, and use as needed. It keeps for months. If it develops an off smell, then discard; but I’ve never had this happen. The alternative to making the vanilla powder would be to just cut a small piece of vanilla from the pod. Cut into small pieces and blend into the recipe. Depending on the quality of your equipment, it may or may not break down completely, and get blended.

If your vanilla bean is too moist and doesn’t powder up in the nut mill, then leave the vanilla bean out at room temperature for a couple of days so that it dries a bit. Under no circumstances put the vanilla bean in a food dehydrator, because it will lose all its flavor. You could even grind up this moist vanilla bean, but it will come out like the texture of ground tobacco, instead of as a powder. This has just as much flavor and works just as well in the recipes. Store in the refrigerator.

NOTE: I use the above as a substitute for commercial vanilla extract which, besides containing alcohol, may be extracted with solvents. Solvents have no place in a healthy diet. Commercial vanilla extract may also contain other additives.